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OOver the years, migration to mines meant that the Basotho food travelled all over South Africa. The food also travels well because of the emphasis on fermentation and preservation – and it’s incredibly delicious.

The Basotho people historically lived in a broad area that encompasses much of South Africa's Free State province and also the independent kingdom of Lesotho. Urbanisation and migrant labour have ensured that you will now often hear the Sotho language spoken in Gauteng. In its traditional heartland, Basotho cooking reflects the agricultural and culinary demands of cold winters and mountainous terrain.

Like many cultures the world over, fermented foods came about as a necessity. The Basotho grind sorghum, millet and maize together to make a polenta-like porridge called ting. The process turns the wheat into a dish that tastes a bit like yoghurt.  

Did You Know?
IIn terms of traditional attire, Sotho people are very well-known for wearing colourful blankets. These are beautifully made and well-crafted.

VVegetables are also preserved. Mangangajane are sundried vegetables with a long-lasting, intense flavour. The spice sekokomogane, made by grinding marula seeds, is another unique addition to meals.

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