Choose your country and language:

Africa

  • Global
  • Angola
  • Botswana
  • DRC
  • Ethiopia
  • Ghana
  • Kenya
  • Malawi
  • Mozambique
  • Namibia
  • Nigeria
  • South Africa
  • Tanzania
  • Uganda
  • Zambia
  • Zimbabwe

Americas

  • USA
  • Argentina
  • Brazil

Asia Pacific

  • China
  • India
  • Japan
  • South Korea
  • Australia

Europe

  • France
  • Germany
  • Italy
  • Netherlands
  • United Kingdom
Back

OOn April 27, 1994, Nelson Mandela, casted his vote at Ohlange Institute, a school founded by John Langalibalele Mafukuzela Dube - the first president of the ANC.                                  

Not only was this the first democratic election in South Africa, but it was also the first time that Mandela had ever voted in his life. Mandela was 72 years old.

Did You Know?
IInanda has more history per square centimetre than anywhere else in South Africa.

AAfter his vote was cast in the school's chapel, Mandela visited Dube's grave, where he is believed to have said: “Mr President, I have come to report to you that South Africa is free today.”

Ohlange Institute

Food
When to visit
How to get here

MMandela chose to travel all the way from Pretoria, on one of the most important days in the history of South Africa, to cast his vote in the chapel of a century-old school in the township of Inanda, 28 km north west of Durban. Dube, built the Ohlange Institute himself (Ohlange means 'where all nations come together'). It was no ordinary school, but a school built and managed by black South Africans at a time when it was held that black people could neither develop nor manage institutions of their own.

DDube's grandson, who witnessed Mandela's journey to the graveside of his grandfather spoke of Mandela's connection with his grandfather's spirit that would give him the strength and wisdom necessary to lead the country.

Inanda is regarded by many as the 'cradle of democracy in South Africa'. It is also believed to have more history per square centimetre than anywhere else in South Africa. As a result, the city of Durban has designed the Inanda Heritage Route, with The Ohlange Institute as one of the prominent stops.

Who to contact
How to get there

Related Articles

Vibrant culture

SA’s top restaurants for travelling foodies (1)

Vibrant culture
SA’s top restaurants for travelling foodies (1)

South Africa’s culinary heritage is as colourful as its flag, and as multi-layered as its 11 official languages.

Vibrant culture

South Africa’s most famous battle sites

Vibrant culture
South Africa’s most famous battle sites

South African society is a fascinating blend of many and varied cultural groups that rub along together in a manner that is, for the most part, peaceful and happy. A historical tour of famous battle sites will bring home to you just how remarkable this is.

Vibrant culture

A glimpse into Durban’s Indian culture

Vibrant culture
A glimpse into Durban’s Indian culture

the Durban skyline becomes visible on the horizon, one can almost hear the beat of the African drum and Indian drum beating in unison in welcome, and my tummy grumbles at the thought of relishing some aromatic Durban curry and shisa nyama (traditional barbequed meat).

Vibrant culture

The must-visit restaurants in Durban

Vibrant culture
The must-visit restaurants in Durban

The must-visit restaurants in Durban.

Vibrant culture

All you need to know about Durban Indian cuisine

Vibrant culture
All you need to know about Durban Indian cuisine

All you need to know about Durban Indian cuisine

Vibrant culture

The rich and diverse Afrikaans culture

Vibrant culture
The rich and diverse Afrikaans culture

The Afrikaans culture is as rich and diverse as the South African landscape.

Vibrant culture

A most representative collection of KwaZulu-Natal heritage

Vibrant culture
A most representative collection of KwaZulu-Natal heritage

A most representative collection of KwaZulu - Natal heritage.

Vibrant culture

South Africa’s top 10 cultural villages

Vibrant culture
South Africa’s top 10 cultural villages

Experience music, dance and food from across the country, as well as Tsonga crafts and Zulu beer-brewing; and don’t forget the magical clicking language of the San people.

South Africa on social media

Copyright © 2018 South African Tourism
|Terms and conditions|Disclaimer|Privacy policy