The giant quiver trees of Namaqualand

Giant quiver trees (called Aloe pillansiiuntil they were recently designated a subspecies of Aloe dichotoma) are critically endangered. Victims of plant collectors, goats and climate change, these magnificent specimens can be seen in northern Namaqualand and the Richtersveld, in South Africa's far north-western corner. They are distinctly different from their shorter cousins. more

Flowering aloes

The Aloe ferox – also known as the red or bitter aloe – is a blessing in winter. With its crimson flowers, it brightens the scenery of the dry inland areas of the Eastern Cape. The medicinally potent sap is sustainably harvested to produce a wide range of cosmetics and health products. more

Knersvlakte

The Knersvlakte, about a three-hour drive north of Cape Town, is a particularly fascinating portion of that well-known biodiversity hotspot, the Succulent Karoo. Sprawling roughly between the towns of Vanrhynsdorp and Bitterfontein, the Knersvlakte’s characteristic white quartzite gravel conceals plants with an indomitable instinct for survival. more

Biodiversity in South Africa

South Africa’s biodiversity springs from the wealth of its ecosystems. An incredibly long coastline, craggy mountains, species-rich deserts, elephant-friendly thickets, montane forests, treed savannahs along with the incomparable Cape Floral Kingdom makes this one of the world's naturally richest countries. more