Culture

    South Africa's Hidden Treasures™

    South Africa’s cultural and creative diversity is inspirational, but the breadth and variety of experiences on offer can be overwhelming too. So how does a new visitor to South Africa tap into the country’s creative soul and immerse themselves in real and authentic experiences? They look for Hidden Treasures™ … more

    Visit a sangoma

    Over 80% of the population of South Africa visits a sangoma more than 3 times a year. These mystical healers exert huge influence over the people of this country, but views of their sangoma rituals, trance states and ancestor worship are only afforded to a fortunate few. more

    Zulu village life

    Each member of the family has a place within a traditional Zulu village setup in KwaZulu-Natal. Beehive-shaped huts are built around the cattle kraal, the family has its sacred spot for worship and ceremony, visitors are greeted by gatekeepers, girls assist their mothers and boys herd the livestock. more

    Newtown Cultural Precinct, Johannesburg

    The Newtown Cultural Precinct, in downtown Johannesburg, has a distinctly cosmopolitan vibe; and underlying its trendy coffee shops, restaurants, art galleries and clubs is the same avant-garde attitude that made it a hot-bed of protest theatre, music and poetry during the apartheid era. more

    Rock art

    South African rock art has survived because of bitter irony. The San were hunted by Europeans, Zulu, Basotho and other tribes because of their belief that livestock should belong to all. They were forced into the Kalahari Desert and the Drakensberg mountains in KwaZulu-Natal - which ensured the survival of their rock paintings. more

    Soweto

    Known the world over for its role in the struggle for democracy, Soweto hums day and night, and its vibe is electrifying. It’s Gucci and ghetto, Hummers and hip hop, Loxion Kulcha (a sought-after local fashion brand that originated in the townships) and livestock, glamour and gogos (grannies). more

    Rock art

    South African rock art has survived because of bitter irony. The San were hunted by Europeans, Zulu, Basotho and other tribes because of their belief that livestock should belong to all. They were forced into the Kalahari Desert and the Drakensberg mountains in KwaZulu-Natal - which ensured the survival of their rock paintings. more

    !Khwa ttu San culture and education centre

    At !Khwa ttu modern man can learn much from the San people, who lived in harmony with nature and practised an ancient ubuntu. Be transported into the past on a moving journey that will leave you with a renewed appreciation of their legacy. more