24 October 2013 by Andrea Weiss

Johannesburg's Museum of African Design (MOAD)

Bringing together ingenious design and industrial chic in the city’s trendy, redbrick Maboneng Precinct, the new Museum of African Design is an exciting addition to downtown Johannesburg.

Museum of African Design (MOAD) opening in downtown Johannesburg. The opening of the Museum of African Design in the Maboneng Precinct, Johannesburg

The new Museum of African Design (MOAD), located in a refurbished 1930s art deco building in downtown Johannesburg, seamlessly blends inner-city grit with urban chic. 

It's yet another excellent reason to visit the Maboneng Precinct, an area of Johannesburg that has broken new ground in urban renewal, achieving an extraordinary transformation from down-and-out to up-and-coming.

And MOAD, the new design museum, adds yet another dimension to the area, a creative space that aims to spark cooperation and innovation across the African continent. The refurbishment of the museum building, with its vast exhibition space on two levels overlooked by enormous windows, is the handiwork of architectural firm Enrico Daffonchio and Associates. 

Judging by the ingenious twist on everyday objects displayed at the launch exhibition, Southern Guild 2013, MOAD is off to a flying start. This 'puzzle bench' made out of French oak is the work of master cabinet-maker Pierre Cronje.


										Pierre Cronje's Puzzle BenchBench

Acoustic fusion guitar duo CH2 (Corneille Hutten-Burger, back, and Leon Gropp) provided the musical accompaniment.


										Guitar duo CH2

Many of the artists were in attendance, like Atang Tshikare (seated), who began his career doing graffiti and installations in the streets of Bloemfontein. 


										Artist Atang Tshikare

And the launch was attended by fashionistas, artists and the downright trendy.


										Walkway from the lower level to the upper level

										The opening of the Southern Guild 2013 exhibition attracted Johannesburg's trendsetters

Sculptor Friday Jibu started carving at the age of 10 and now exhibits at the Everard Read Gallery. His Gule Wamkulu Dancers are made of wild olive wood.


										Friday Jibu's Gule Wamkulu Dancers

John Vogel's Bloom, created from American walnut, is a stunning centrepiece.


										Daisy chain table by John Vogel

And controversial satirical artist Brett Murray contributed this work, called Crown Jewels.


										Brett Murray's Crown Jewels

Outside a beautiful old building opposite the entrance to MOAD, under a soft spring Johannesburg sky, awaits yet another magical brushstroke of Maboneng's transformation.


										Soft Johannesburg sky

The Museum of African Design is open Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 10am to 6pm, and on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10am to 10pm.

Category: Arts & Entertainment, Attractions, Culture & History, Events

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