14 November 2012 by Kate Turkington

It’s for the birds!

South Africa is one of the world’s top birding destinations, a place where you can see some amazing species. Subscribe to the glossy new African Birdlife magazine and find out the whys, whens, wheres and hows of birdwatching in South Africa.

African Birdlife magazine

South Africa is one of the world’s most exciting birding destinations – think Pel’s fishing owl, bearded vulture, African penguin, crimson boubou ... as well as over 800 more birds of every shape and size.

The highly endangered saddle-billed stork

We have one of the world’s heaviest flying birds (the stately kori bustard) as well as a tiny bird that flies further in its migration route than any other: the diminutive willow warbler.

I was recently at the launch in Johannesburg of African Birdlife, the new magazine published by BirdLife South Africa, which is a global first as no other BirdLife organisation has yet matched this feat.

Widely recognised as one of Africa’s top conservation NGOs, BirdLife South Africa, says CEO Mark Anderson, 'will now showcase its work, highlight conservation stories and raise awareness of the plight of our continent’s birds and their habitats'.

Some of BirdLife South Africa’s major donors were honoured at the event, and we all ended up talking birds – what birds we have in our gardens, our favourite feathered friends, and places to go to see birds. (There are plenty of opportunities, even if you’re in a city for just a day.

Although he’s just as cheeky as his international cousins, he’s much more handsome with his smart black face and bib.

Remember that you don’t even have to go to our fabled bush to see very special birds. When you arrive at OR Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg or Cape Town International Airport, keep your eyes open immediately. On the runways, sometimes in the airport buildings themselves, you’ll see our endemic Cape sparrow. You won’t find him in London or Sydney.

Although he’s just as cheeky as his international cousins, he’s much more handsome with his smart black face and bib.

Category: Wildlife


comments powered by Disqus