20 August 2010 by Robyn Campbell

Dik Delta veldfood garden - the edible side of heritage

Solms Delta wine estate recently opened the Dik Delta Fynbos Reserve, a 15-hectare Fynbos/Renosterveld conservancy, at the heart of which is a unique culinary garden.

The new 2-hectare veld food garden contains 400 edible plants, among them raaptol, an indigenous radish, veldkool, wild asparagus, and vinkelknol, a wild fennel bulb, to name a few.

These little-known veld foods, that would have nourished the region’s former Khoe inhabitants, are now deliciously available to you in Solms Delta’s Fyndraai restaurant.

To coincide with the opening of the Dik Delta Fynbos culinary garden, Fyndraai Restaurant’s chef, Shaun Schoeman, has created a new Cape rural heritage menu.

Each course consists of 3 separate traditional Khoi-San or Veldkos, Boerekos, and Cape Malay inspired dishes (9 dishes in total) prepared with ingredients harvested from the Dik Delta garden.

Each course consists of 3 separate traditional Khoi-San or Veldkos, Boerekos, and Cape Malay inspired dishes (9 dishes in total) prepared with ingredients harvested from the Dik Delta garden.

Visitors can tour the gardens and learn about the endangered, edible treasures grown there before sitting down to a 3-course tasting-menu, paired with Solms Delta wines.

The new Solms Delta veld food garden and heritage menu combines gastronomic pleasure and biodiversity conservation for a deliciously authentic Cape culinary adventure.

Food conservation is an area where, ironically, one of the ways to save scarce and threatened species from extinction is to eat them, so book your Solms Delta Food of Origin experience soon.

Book at least 3 days in advance; minimum 6 persons, cost R165.00 pp.

Category: Food & Wine

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