30 April 2013 by Denise Slabbert

All that’s missing is the beach…

You can ‘Savour the Sizzle of Mozambique’ in May when the Southern Sun OR Tambo International Airport hotel celebrates the country that brought us the magic that is piri piri.

Prawns in a coconut served on a banana leaf with fresh lemon. Image courtesy of Tsogo Sun

Speak to anyone who has been to Mozambique and they’ll soon be waxing lyrical about the food – mountains of piri piri prawns served with a cold cerveza  (beer) and a view of the ocean.

The good news is that the Southern Sun OR Tambo International Airport hotel is offering a ‘Savour the Sizzle of Mozambique’ three-course dinner buffet from 7 to 9 May.

Calamari served with fresh mango. Image courtesy Tsogo Sun

Three senior chefs from Maputo Sun – Jose Cossa, Adamuji Jorge and Carlos Matlombe – will be cooking up a proverbial storm for diners keen to try out specialities such as roasted suckling pig, roasted red snapper and a multitude of other tasty delicacies.

So what can you expect?

Well, the cuisine of neighbouring Mozambique has been influenced by Portugal, yet retains a rich African interpretation inspired by fresh local produce. Flavour is the heartbeat of any Mozambican dish, and chillies, lemon juice and spices are always an integral part of any meal, as is its famous piri piri sauce (a traditional hot sauce added to most seafood dishes).

The use of wine in Mozambican cooking came from Portugal and you might want to try out matata (a dish made of clams cooked in wine, fruit/vegetables and peanuts); or how about a frango a cafrial, a chicken that has been rubbed with piri piri and roasted over the hot coals? You could try the bacalau (cod) or lemony calamari, or, if you're watching your waistline, a traditional avocado salad.

If you have a taste for unapologetically spicy food, then book your place at the ‘Savour the Sizzle of Mozambique’ event and fuel your food memories for years to come.

Lobster salad is also an option, while many dishes contain cashew nuts and/or coconut. Many Mozambiquan curries are served with a mango atchar (chutney). You might also want to try some local wines or port to accompany your meal. Of course, you can always finish off with a delicious pasteis de nata (Portuguese custard cups).

If you have a taste for unapologetically spicy food, then book your place at the 'Savour the Sizzle of Mozambique' event and fuel your food memories for years to come. The three-night festival of Mozambiquan cuisine promises to be a fun affair – and while the views of the ocean might not be part of the scenery, great food, excellent wine and superb company certainly will be.

Make sure you bring a healthy appetite along!

For bookings contact +27 (0)11 977 3600 or visit tsogosun.com.

Pan-fried prawns. Image Darling Lama Productions

 

Category: Food & Wine

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